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PITHY QUOTE FROM British Philosophy: 1600-1900

Open quotes
The arguments of tyranny are as contemptible as its force is dreadful.

British Philosophy 1600-1900. Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France, p. 156, hp. 93

British Philosophy: 1600-1900 book cover

British Philosophy: 1600-1900

ISBN: 978-1-57085-256-5

Language: English and Latin

MARC Records



Frontispiece of Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan, or The Matter, Forme, and Power of a Common-Wealth Ecclesiastical and Civill. London: Andrew Crooke, 1651

British Philosophy 1600-1900. Compiled and edited by Mark C. Rooks. Charlottesville: InteLex Corporation, 1993.

This collection contains the complete texts of the following Past Masters titles:

  • Hobbes: English Works
  • Locke-Berkeley-Hume
  • Economics: Smith to Mill
  • The Utilitarians

Included at no additional charge are:

  • Francis Bacon's Novum Organum (in English and Latin)
  • The Selby-Bigge two-volume edition of The British Moralists (with excerpts from Butler, S. Clarke, J. Clarke, Wollaston, Cudworth, Hutcheson, Balguy, Kames, Paley, Shaftesbury, Smith, Mandeville, and Brown)
  • Anne Conway's The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy (in English and Latin)
  • Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France
  • Sidgwick's Outline of the History of Ethics.

Bibliography

  Francis Bacon   John Locke
  Jeremy Bentham   John Stuart Mill
  George Berkeley   David Ricardo
  Anne Conway   British Moralists
  Thomas Hobbes   Henry Sidgwick
  David Hume   Adam Smith

Francis Bacon

Edition notes:

Novum Organum

The Latin edition of Novum Organum was created by generating electronic versions of both the Spedding and Ellis edition, and the Oxford University Press Fowler edition, then comparing the two. All word discrepancies between the two editions have been rendered as variants.

The New Organon

The English translation of The New Organon is that of the Spedding and Ellis edition, which is still the most widely used.

Texts:

Bacon, Francis. Novum Organum. Edited by Thomas Fowler. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1873.

_____. The Philosophical Works of Francis Bacon. Edited by John M. Robertson. New York: Books for Libraries Press, 1970.

_____. The Works of Francis Bacon. Edited by James Spedding, Robert Leslie Ellis, and Douglas Denon Heath. London: Longmans & Co., 1875.

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Jeremy Bentham

Edition notes: The Bentham texts were drawn from the 1776 First Edition A Fragment on Government, and from the 1823 Second Edition Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation. We have also included (from the 1838 Bowring edition) the "Historical Preface, intended for the Second Edition," of A Fragment on Government. Page numbers included in the reference lines of the database were drawn from the 1977 Burns and Hart edition of the Fragment, and the 1970 Burns and Hart edition of the Principles.

In this edition of the Principles, we have silently included corrections made either by Bowring or by the 1907 Clarendon edition, which were based on a 1789 sheet of corrections, several of which were overlooked in the 1823 edition.

In the Principles, Bentham's section numbers are not used in the reference lines, except in the table of contents.

Texts:

Bentham, Jeremy. A Comment on the Commentaries and A Fragment on Government. Edited by J. H. Burns and H. L. A. Hart. London: University of London, The Athlone Press, 1977.

_____. A Fragment on Government. London: Printed for T. Payne, at the Mews Gate; P. Elmsley, opposite Southampton Street in the Strand; and E. Brooks, in Bell Yard, Temple Bar, 1776.

_____. A Fragment on Government. Edited by F. C. Montague. London: Oxford University Press, 1891.

_____. A Fragment on Government and An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation. Edited by Wilfrid Harrison. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1948.

_____. "Historical Preface, intended for the Second Edition." In The Works of Jeremy Bentham. Vol. 1, 240-59. Edited by John Bowring. Edinburgh: W. Tait, 1838-43.

_____. An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation. 2 vols. London: E. Wilson, Royal Exchange, and W. Pickering, Lincoln's Inn Fields, 1823.

_____. An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1907.

_____. An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation. Edited by J. H. Burns and H. L. A. Hart. London: University of London, The Athlone Press, 1970.

_____. The Works of Jeremy Bentham. Edited by John Bowring. Edinburgh: W. Tait, 1838-43.

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George Berkeley

Edition notes: The text of all four works was drawn primarily from the 1843 Wright edition. We have deleted all of Wright's footnotes except his variant readings.

Of the Principles of Human Knowledge

The text of the Principles of Human Knowledge differs from the Wright edition in two ways (excluding the footnote deletion mentioned above): 1) Wright bracketed what he called the "leading terms" of each section; these brackets have been deleted; 2) Wright began most sections with the table of contents entry in italics; we have deleted this introductory passage from all sections in which it occurs. This passage still occurs in the table of contents entry.

Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous

Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous is as Wright published it, except for whatever spelling errors we may have caught.

"An Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision"

The text of "An Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision" is as Wright published it, except, again, for whatever spelling errors we may have caught. The diagrams which appear in the work are included as graphic images in the database.

Alciphron: or, the Minute Philosopher

The Alciphron of Wright has been substantially altered; Wright published a version of the First Edition of the Alciphron. Because the Third Edition (the last published in Berkeley's lifetime) contained substantial additions and alterations, we checked all of Jessop's (1950) variant readings against the 1752 Third Edition, and altered the text to agree with Berkeley's Third Edition. What resulted was an edition much closer to Berkeley than that of Jessop, since Jessop took far greater liberties with punctuation than did Wright. In the area we checked, i.e. all Third Edition alterations relative to the First Edition, we noted over 150 discrepancies between Berkeley's Third Edition, and Jessop's representation of it. Jessop made at least one error in speaker assignment in the dialogue, as well as three minor word errors in the sections we checked (i.e. the Third Edition changes).

In the Past Masters edition of the Alciphron, all text (other than editorial notes) appearing in brackets, is text which appeared in the Third Edition but not the First Edition.

Texts:

Berkeley, George. Alciphron: or, the Minute Philosopher. 3rd ed. London: J. and R. Tonson and S. Draper in the Strand, 1752.

_____. The Works of George Berkeley, Bishop of Cloyne. Edited by T. E. Jessop. Vols. 2 and 3 of 9. London: Thomas Nelson and Sons Ltd., 1949, 1950.

_____. The Works of George Berkeley, Bishop of Cloyne. Edited by A. A. Luce. Vol. 1 of 9. London: Thomas Nelson and Sons Ltd., 1948.

_____. The Works of George Berkeley, D. D., Bishop of Cloyne. Edited by Rev. G. N. Wright. Vol. 1 of 2. London: Printed for Thomas Tegg, 1843.

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Anne Conway

Edition notes:

The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy

The text is based on the Latin and English 1692 edition published in London. Page numbers refer to the modern edition edited by Peter Loptson.

Texts:

Conway, Anne. The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy. Edited by Peter Loptson. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1982.

_____. The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy. London: Paternoster Row, 1692.

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Thomas Hobbes

Edition notes:

The Elements of Law

The Elements of Law is a reproduction of the 1889 Tönnies edition. All variant readings have been moved to the end of the chapter in which they are found. Two typographical corrections were made in the text of the Tönnies. The text of the editor's preface concerned with The Elements of Law has been retained; the text describing the material included in the appendix has been deleted (since we do not include the material in the appendix). Page numbers in the reference line refer to the page number in the Tönnies.

De Cive

De Cive was scanned from the Molesworth edition but proofread against the 1651 English edition. We found over 250 word and phrase discrepancies with the 1651; we have made these discrepancies variants, except where noted. The variants are significant in that Molesworth worked with the more authoritative Latin edition in hand; hence many of the non-biblical variants represent improvements or simply corrections of the controversial 1651 English, which Molesworth based on the Latin. (Molesworth even caught errors Warrender missed.) We are indebted to Prof. Edwin Curley for checking a number of the discrepancies, and for translating one passage of the Latin. The first page number on a reference line (p.) indicates the page number of the corresponding passage in the Warrender (1983) edition; the second page number (mp.) indicates the page number in Molesworth.

Leviathan

The Leviathan was also scanned from the Molesworth edition, but proofread against the 1651 "Head" edition. Molesworth based his edition on the "Bear" edition. (Cf. Mcpherson's introduction to the Leviathan.) Again we have made the 1651 the primary text, and made the Molesworth discrepancies variants, except where noted. We have noted 371 variants. The only word discrepancies which should remain are those connected with the manner in which references are cited ((e.g.) the 21. chapter vs. chapter 21.) and use of possessives. Hobbes usually writes Moses' time as Moses time, but sometimes as Moses his time; we have followed Molesworth in using modern conventions concerning possessives. The first page number on a reference line (p.) indicates the page number in Molesworth; the second page number (mp.) indicates the page number in the Mcpherson Penguin edition (1985).

We have made over 1000 punctuation changes in the Leviathan, and over 400 in De Cive, based on the 1651 editions; however, many more would need to be made to make the punctuation precisely that of the 1651. We have retained the spelling and capitalization conventions of Molesworth. We believe it is preferable to have modernized spelling in a search context, since the researcher would otherwise have to recall or speculate how a word might have been spelled in (e.g.) 1651, in order to search for it.

Texts:

De Cive

The Elements of Law

Leviathan

Elements of Philosophy (including De Corpore)

Answer to Dr. Bramhall

An Historical Narration Concering Heresy, And The Punishment Thereof

Considerations upon the Reputation, Loyalty, Manners, and Religion of Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury

Answer to Sir William Davenant's Preface before Gondibert

Letter to Edward Howard

Questions concerning Liberty, Necessity, and Chance

Dialogue between a Philosopher and a Student

Behemoth

The Whole Art of Rhetoric

The Art of Rhetoric

The Art of Sophistry

Seven Philosophical Problems

Decameron Physiologicum

Proportion of a Straight Line to Half the Arc of a Quadrant

Six Lessons to the Professors of the Mathematics, one of Geometry, the other of Astronomy, etc.

{STIGMAI}, or Marks of the Absurd Geometry, Rural Language, etc.

An Extract of a Letter Concerning the Grammatical Part of the Controversy Between Mr. Hobbes and Dr. Wallis.

Three Papers against Dr. Wallis

Considerations on the Answer of Dr. Wallis

Letters and other Pieces

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David Hume

Edition notes:

A Treatise of Human Nature

The text of A Treatise of Human Nature is a corrected edition of the Everyman's Library Edition, London: 1911. In proofreading the text we corrected several spelling errors. We proofread the text as against the 1882 Green & Grose Treatise, and used the Selby-Bigge edition to arbitrate discrepancies.

An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding

The text of An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding is a corrected edition of the Green & Grose edition and includes Green & Grose's variant readings. The proofread text of the Green & Grose was proofread against the Open Court edition, and all word discrepancies were arbitrated by the 1758 edition.

An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals

The text of An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals is a corrected edition drawn from the 1898 Green & Grose and includes the Green & Grose variant readings. The proofread text of the Green & Grose was proofread against the 1854 Works, and all word discrepancies were arbitrated by the 1758 edition.

"My Own Life"

The text of "My Own Life" was based on the 1898 Green & Grose edition, but proofread against Eugene F. Miller's Essays.

Essays: Moral, Political, and Literary

The text of the 1898 edition of the Green & Grose Hume's Essays was used as our base for Hume's Essays: Moral, Political, and Literary. We proofread the Green & Grose against the Miller edition (editiorial additions (c) 1987), and relied upon the Miller edition in case of discrepancies.

Miller found 100 word discrepancies between Green & Grose and the 1777 edition of the Essays (the last published in Hume's lifetime), and 175 punctuation differences. We are indebted to Prof. Miller for his efforts; we did not have access to a 1777 edition. We corrected those spelling errors in Miller which were not also in Green & Grose (e.g. splendour for spendour). We found 5 such discrepancies. Those spelling errors which occur both in Miller and in Green & Grose (e.g. falshood) remain. Prior to publishing this work we consulted both Prof. Miller and the Liberty Fund, both of whom kindly consented to our using Prof. Miller's textual corrections.

All of the essays of Volume 1 of the 1898 Green & Grose are included in the Past Masters edition. Volume 2 is published complete with the following exceptions:

"On the Authenticity of Ossian's Poems"; "Concerning Wilkie's Epigoniad"; "Dedication of Four Dissertations"; "A Descent on the Coast of Brittany, 1746"; and "Scotticisms"

"A Dissertation on the Passions"

The text of "A Dissertation on the Passions" is drawn from Volume 2 of the Green & Grose, but proofread against the 1854 Works, with word discrepancies checked against the 1758 edition.

The Natural History of Religion

The text and variant readings of The Natural History of Religion is that of Green & Grose.

Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion

The text of the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion is that of the 1854 Works.

Texts:

Hume, David. An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding and Selections from A Treatise of Human Nature. Chicago: Open Court, 1912.

_____. A Treatise of Human Nature. Edited by P. H. Nidditch. 2nd ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press; New York: Oxford University Press, 1978.

_____. A Treatise of Human Nature. Edited by Ernest Rhys. Everyman's Library ed. London: J. M. Dent & Sons Ltd.; New York: E. P. Dutton, 1911.

_____. Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. Edited by Norman Kemp Smith. Indianapolis: Bobbs Merrill, 1947.

_____. Enquiries Concerning Human Understanding and Concerning the Principles of Morals. Edited by P. H. Nidditch. 3rd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1975.

_____. Essays and Treatises on Several Subjects. London: Millar, Kincaid, Donaldson, 1758.

_____. Essays Moral, Political, and Literary. Edited by T. H. Green and T. H. Grose. 2 vols. London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1898.

_____. Essays Moral, Political, and Literary. Edited by Eugene F. Miller. Revised edition. Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, Inc., 1987.

_____. The Philosophical Works. Edited by Thomas Hill Green and Thomas Hodge Grose. 4 vols. London: Longman, 1882-86.

_____. The Philosophical Works of David Hume. 4 vols. Edinburgh: Printed for A. Black and W. Tait, 1854.

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John Locke

Edition notes:

An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

Both An Essay Concerning Human Understanding and Two Treatises of Civil Government were based on the Twelfth Edition of Locke's Works. The words of the Twelfth were checked against the Dover edition of the Essay; all word discrepancies were checked against the Fourth Edition of the Essay (the last published in Locke's lifetime), with the Fourth arbitrating in all such cases. The text deviates by more than 100 words from both the Twelfth and the Dover. The punctuation is that of the Twelfth (which is close to the Fourth), with the exception noted below.

We have deleted from the Twelfth several footnotes which did not appear in the Fourth. These footnotes primarily consisted of correspondence of Locke inserted by the editors to explicate some point in the text.

Whereas the Fourth Edition made frequent use of italics, the Twelfth for the most part used quotation marks in their stead. However, certain italicized phrases in the Fourth were neither italicized nor placed in quotation marks in the Twelfth. We have improved on the effort of the Twelfth in this regard, by placing in quotation marks certain words or phrases italicized in the Fourth, but neither in quotation marks nor italics in the Twelfth. We found two word discrepancies between the Twelfth and the Dover in those passages added in the Fifth Edition [London: 1706]; in these two cases (which did not change the sense of what was being said) we relied upon the Twelfth.

Two Treatises of Civil Government

The words of Locke's Two Treatises of Civil Government were proofread against the 1714 and 1728 editions, with two out of three arbitrating discrepancies. We have created variant readings where the differences were phrase rather than word length. The Twelfth edition treated quotes very poorly indeed, and here we relied upon the earlier editions. Locke frequently quotes the work of Sir Robert Filmer. If a passage in the Twelfth is of the form "Quote from Filmer . . A few words from Locke . . Quote from Filmer," the Twelfth has a nasty habit of including the entire passage in quotation marks.

The Twelfth used quotation marks instead of italics. This convention is followed in the Past Masters edition.

Texts:

Locke, John. An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. 4th ed. London: Printed for Awnsham and John Churchill at the Black Swan, and Samuel Manship at the Ship, 1700.

_____. An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. Edited by Alexander Fraser Campbell. New York: Dover, 1959.

_____. An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. Edited by P. H. Nidditch. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1975.

_____. Collected Works. 1st ed. 3 vols. London: Printed for John Churchill at the Black Swan in Pater-Noster-Row, and Sam. Manship at the Ship in Cornhill, 1714.

_____. Two Treatises of Government. 5th ed. London: Printed for A. Bettesworth in Pater-Noster Row, J. Pemberton in Fleetstreet, and E. Symon in Cornhill, 1728.

_____. Two Treatises of Government. Edited by Peter Laslett. Student edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988.

_____. The Works of John Locke. 12th ed. Vols. 1, 2, and 4 of 9. London: Printed for C. and J. Rivington, etc., 1824.



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John Stuart Mill

Edition notes:

All of the Past Masters Mill texts were drawn from the last edition published in Mill's lifetime, with two exceptions: "Chapters on Socialism" was first published posthumously in Fortnightly Review; and The Subjection of Women (1869) was drawn from the First Edition. Two later editions appeared in Mill's lifetime, without alteration (the Third Edition in 1870). The text of Mill's Principles of Political Economy is a corrected Seventh Edition (the basis for both the Toronto and Ashley editions).

Texts:

Mill, John Stuart. Utilitarianism. 4th ed. London: Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer, 1871.

_____. Utilitarianism. In Collected Works of John Stuart Mill. Vol. 10, Essays on Ethics, Religion, and Society. Edited by J. M. Robson, 203-59. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1969.

_____. Utilitarianism. Edited by George Sher. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Co., 1979.

_____. On Liberty. 4th ed. London: Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer, 1869.

_____. On Liberty. In Collected Works of John Stuart Mill. Edited by J. M. Robson. Vol. 18, Essays on Politics and Society, 213-310. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1977.

_____. On Liberty. Edited by Elizabeth Rapaport. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Co., 1978.

_____. The Subjection of Women. 1st ed. London: Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer, 1869.

_____. The Subjection of Women. In Collected Works of John Stuart Mill. Edited by J. M. Robson. Vol. 21, Essays on Equality, Law, and Education, 259-340. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1984.

_____. The Subjection of Women. Edited by Susan Moller Okin. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Co., 1988.

_____. Considerations on Representative Government. 3rd ed. London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts & Green, 1865.

_____. Considerations on Representative Government. In Collected Works of John Stuart Mill. Edited by J. M. Robson. Vol. 19, Essays on Politics and Society. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1977.

_____. "Chapters on Socialism." Fortnightly Review (February 1879): 217-37; (March 1879): 373-382; (April 1879): 513-530.

_____. "Chapters on Socialism." In Collected Works of John Stuart Mill. Edited by J. M. Robson. Vol. 5, Essays on Economics and Society, 703-53. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1967.

_____. "Bentham." In Dissertations and Discussions. 2nd ed. Vol. 1, 330-92. London: Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer, 1867.

_____. "Bentham." In Collected Works of John Stuart Mill. Vol. 10, Essays on Ethics, Religion, and Society. Edited by J. M. Robson, 75-115. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1969.

_____. "Coleridge." In Dissertations and Discussions. 2nd ed. Vol. 1, 393-466. London: Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer, 1867.

_____. "Coleridge." In Collected Works of John Stuart Mill. Edited by J. M. Robson. Vol. 10, Essays on Ethics, Religion, and Society, 117-63. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1969.

_____. "Dr. Whewell on Moral Philosophy." In Dissertations and Discussions. 2nd ed. Vol. 2, 450-509. London: Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer, 1867.

_____. "Whewell on Moral Philosophy." In Collected Works of John Stuart Mill. Edited by J. M. Robson. Vol. 10, Essays on Ethics, Religion, and Society, 165-201. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1969.

_____. Principles of Political Economy, with Some of Their Applications to Social Philosophy. 4th ed. London: John W. Parker and Son, 1857.

_____. Principles of Political Economy, with Some of Their Applications to Social Philosophy. 7th ed. London: Longmans, Green, Reader & Dyer, 1871.

_____. Principles of Political Economy, with Some of Their Applications to Social Philosophy. Edited by Sir W. J. Ashley. London: Longmans, Green & Co., 1909.

_____. Principles of Political Economy, with Some of Their Applications to Social Philosophy. In Collected Works of John Stuart Mill. Edited by J. M. Robson. Vols. 2 and 3. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1965.

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David Ricardo

Edition notes: The text of Ricardo's On the Principles of Political Economy, and Taxation is a reproduction of the Third Edition (the last in Ricardo's lifetime and basis for the Cambridge critical edition).

Texts:

Ricardo, David. On the Principles of Political Economy, and Taxation. 3rd ed. London: John Murray, Albemarle Street, 1821.

_____. On the Principles of Political Economy, and Taxation. In The Works and Correspondence of David Ricardo. Edited by Piero Sraffa. Vol. 1. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1953.

_____. Principles of Political Economy and Taxation. Edited by E. C. K. Gonner. London: G. Bell and Sons, Ltd., 1911.


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L. A. Selby-Bigge British Moralists

Edition notes:

The text of the Selby-Bigge edition of British Moralists is reproduced, except for the exclusion of excerpts from works which appear elsewhere in the database in their entirety. For example an excerpt from Hobbes' Leviathan appears in Selby-Bigge, but since the entire work appears elsewhere in the database, there is little point in including the excerpt.

Texts:

Selby-Bigge, Lewis Amherst. British Moralists. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1897.

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Henry Sidgwick

Edition notes:

Outlines of the History of Ethics

The text is based on the Fifth Edition of the Ethics published in 1902 by Macmillan.

The Methods of Ethics

The Past Masters edition of The Methods of Ethics is a reproduction of the Seventh Edition.

Texts:

Sidgwick, Henry. The Methods of Ethics. London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., 1907.

_____. Outlines of the History of Ethics. 5th ed. London: Macmillan & Co., 1902.

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Adam Smith

Edition notes:

An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations

The text of Smith's An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations is a corrected edition of the Cannan critical edition. The Second, Third, and Sixth editions were used to justify the more than 50 word corrections which were made in the Cannan text.

The Cannan notes and critical apparatus are included. Within Smith's notes, Cannan's remarks are bracketed. All notes which are Cannan's but not Smith's have only a page number from Cannan. All of Smith's notes have both an Oxford and a Cannan page reference.

Texts:

Smith, Adam. An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. 2nd ed. London: W. Strahan and T. Cadell, 1778.

_____. An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. 3rd ed. London: W. Strahan and T. Cadell, 1784.

_____. An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. 6th ed. London: W. Strahan and T. Cadell, 1791.

_____. An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. In The Glasgow Edition of the Works and Correspondence of Adam Smith. Edited by R. H. Campbell, A. S. Skinner, and W. B. Todd. Vol. II, parts 1 and 2. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1976.

_____. An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. Edited by Edwin Cannan. New York: Random House, 1937.

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"There are cases," Coleridge once wrote, "in which more value may be conveyed by the history of a word than by the history of a campaign," and these Past Masters [collections] constitute a great aid to such enterprises. . . .

Impressive care has been taken in establishing these texts.

—Journal of the History of Ideas