Top-strip.red-1170
Rembrandt

Please Contact Us if you have any questions or to report any problems.

PITHY QUOTE FROM Women's Sensation Fiction

Open quotes
I don’t like the plan of introducing you, my readers, to so many people, raising so many interests, as it were; but this temporary sojourn of Eleanor Seymour at the school was to bear its fruit, not pleasant fruit for Rose, and you must hear of it, for you would never understand her character so well otherwise: not if I wrote pages and pages.

Varieties of Women's Sensation Fiction, 1855-1890. Volume 3, Gothic Sensationalism. St Martin’s Eve (1866), Vol. I.

Varieties of Women's Sensation Fiction, 1855-1890. Electronic Edition. book cover

Varieties of Women's Sensation Fiction, 1855-1890. Electronic Edition.

ISBN: 978-1-57085-178-0

Language: English

MARC Records



Mrs Henry Wood. Detail: The miniature by Reginald Easton taken from Memorials (1894)

List of Contents

Varieties of Women's Sensation Fiction, 1855-1890. General editor, Andrew Maunder. Consulting editor, Sally Mitchell. 6 vols. London: Pickering & Chatto, 2004.

  • Vol. 1. Sensationalism and the Sensation Debate. Edited by Andrew Maunder
  • Vol. 2. Domestic Sensationalism. Florence Marryat, Love's conflict (1865). Edited by Andrew Maunder
  • Vol. 3. Gothic Sensationalism. Ellen Wood, St Martin's eve (1866). Edited by Lyn Pykett
  • Vol. 4. Sensation With a Purpose. Felicia Skene, Hidden depths (1866). Edited by Lillian Nayder. Erotic sensationalism. Rhoda Broughton, Cometh Up as a Flower (1867). Edited by Tamar Heller
  • Vol. 5. Sensation and Detection. Mary Cecil Hay, Old Myddelton's money (1874). Edited by Mark Knight
  • Vol. 6. Newspaper Sensationalism. Dora Russell, Beneath the Wave (1878). Edited by Graham Law



. . . it is hard to imagine any other way of examining a collected correspondence. . . . These electronic versions should be accessible to all levels of readers; they are essential for specialists.

—Choice


You are producing an outstandingly helpful scholarly resource of ever-increasing value.

—Quentin Skinner
Regius Professor of Modern History
University of Cambridge
U.K.